Tag Archive for executor

Digital Assets and Estate Planning: Have You Updated Your Estate Plan?

Your digital assets could have economic or sentimental value

Outlining what is to be done with your digital assets can save frustration, heartache and lots of red tape for family, friends and representatives who need to handle your affairs. Otherwise, your family or executor may spend countless hours and still not be able to track down all of these assets.

Why should you include digital assets? First, digital assets could have economic or sentimental value. Secondly, if they cannot be tracked down, they may be lost forever. An article in MarketWatch suggests your estate could even be put at risk for fraud or hacking due to lost accounts.

Not sure if you have digital assets? Do you have email? A PayPal account? Online banking or shopping accounts? Online photos of family or friends? Social media pages? Do you back up your phone or computer data to the cloud? Do you get paperless bills? If you answered yes to any of these, you have digital assets.

How do you protect your digital assets in the event you can’t manage them on your own, such as through illness or death? Consider these tips:

Create a list of all of your digital assets.
Include information on how to access the account (such as providing a website address). Provide your login information, including username and password. Add any secret words or answers to security questions that may be required to verify the account. If an account requires two-factor authentication, provide the cell phone number and how to access the phone so your executor can receive the text message on that device to get into the account.

Update your Power of Attorney,
Updating your Power of Attorney gives that person power to manage your digital assets if you become incapacitated. We found the following language samples others have added to their Power of Attorney documents at http://www.thedigitalbeyond.com/sample-language. You can add this information to our do-it-yourself General and Durable Power of Attorney Legal Form Kit as an instant download from our website. An estate planning attorney can also help you add the right wording to your Power of Attorney.

Add language about digital assets to your will.
We offer a do-it-yourself Will Forms Kit to which you can add a statements saying your attorney or executor has power to manage digital assets. Also, you may want to outline which assets go to which person. Including instructions on how to close your online assets or let your social media acquaintances know what’s going on could also be included. Click here for a sample of language you can use in your will to give an executor power to handle your assets. An attorney can also help set up a will that thoroughly covers digital assets.

 

Estate Planning To Do List

No one wants to think about end of life issues. But right now is the time to jump into estate planning to make it easier on your family and loved ones in the event of your death. By engaging in estate planning now, you also have control of what happens to your property and other possessions so they are disbursed according to your wishes. Get started with these five estate planning tasks.

Write a Will

Without a will, you allow the state to call all the shots about how your estate is divided up when you die. If you still have dependents, the state also decides what will happen to them. Having a will alleviates these problems. We offer a do-it-yourself will kit for Washington state, complete with instructions, for those who have simple wishes for their estate. Choose from an instant download or request a print verson be mailed to you. We can also help get your will notarized at our office located in the King County Courthouse office. If you have more complex needs, hire a probate attorney. Click here to view the list of probate and estate planning law firms listed in our referral service.


Designate a Power of Attorney for Finances/Legal/Health Care

In Washington state, in the event that you are not available or incapable of acting on your own behalf or if you need health care decisions made for you, a General and Durable Power of Attorney with health care provisions, designating someone to make these decisions on your behalf is an essential document in your estate planning. The person you choose can be an attorney, a family member or a close friend who you trust to make decisions on your behalf. Since this form can be easily completed on your own, we offer a do-it-yourself General and Durable Power of Attorney legal kit for Washington statey, available as an instant download or as a print version. Always seek the advice of an attorney if you need help completing the forms.

Choose Health Care Directive

You also need a Health Care Directive (Directive to Physicians/Living Will) to instruct your physician and/or health care providers on your intentions as to organ donation and whether or not you want extra-ordinary life sustaining care such as feeding and breathing if your are in a terminal condition. This legal form can be easily completed on your own, so we offer a do-it-yourself Health Care Directive (Directive to Physicians/Living Will) legal kit for Washington state, available as an instant download or as a print version. If you spend part of your time living in another state, make sure you have a Health Care Power of Attorney for that state, too. Always seek the advice of an estate planning attorney if you need help completing the forms. Click here to view our list of probate and estate planning law firms listed in our referral service.

Gather Estate Planning Documents

Your family and attorney need to know the whereabouts of your important paperwork, such as birth certificates, marriage licenses, property deeds, life insurance policies, contact lists and financial information. Otherwise, if they must search your entire home or arrange to get copies of these important documents, it could take them months to close your estate. Paäge et Cie, experts at organizing and managing important documents, has created a  checklist you can download for free. The checklist provides a thorough list of all of the documents you need and includes space for keeping notes about the location of each piece of paperwork.

 

Choose an Executor

An executor, also known as an administrator, settles the debts you leave behind and disburses your property and possessions according to your will. An attorney can act as your executor while also helping with various aspects of your estate before you die, including writing wills, helping you set up a power of attorney and safekeeping important documents needed to settle your estate. Click here to view the list of estate planning law firms we work with. See our recent blog post, Questions to Ask A Potential Attorney or Law Firm Before You Hire Them.