Tag Archive for Washington state

3 Tips To Help You and Your Spouse Talk to Your Kids About Divorce

talk to your kids about divorce

Like most parents, you hope to never need to talk to your kids about divorce. But divorce happens, and when it does, your kids need to understand the situation and how it affects them. Your kids may be more perceptive about what’s going on than you think, which makes the conversation all the more important. Follow these tips to talk to your kids about divorce and make sure they understand what’s going on and feel reassured about their future.

Explain Together

This is the time for you and your spouse to put aside your differences and make a statement together in front of your kids. Don’t fight with each other during this conversation, as the goal is to show your children that you can work together as parents. Also avoid the blame game or making negative comments about each other in front of your kids during this conversation, says Liana Lowenstein, MSW, a therapist who offers resources for families going through divorce. Click here to read her article, Explaining Separation/Divorce to Children.

Script It

Don’t improvise the conversation when you talk to your kids about divorce. Instead, decide what to say beforehand, and stick to the script. Start by understanding your child’s age group and what’s essential to them. Today’s Parent offers a thorough age by age guide worth a read before you create your script.

Gerald A. Falzone, a family law attorney, says there’s no need to pretend everything is fine during this conversation. He suggests keeping things simple and about facts. Get ideas about what to say in his article, Joint Custody: How to Talk With Your Kids About Divorce.

Basically, explain when the divorce will take place and which parent will be staying in the home and which one will be moving out. Talk to them about when they will see the other parent, according to your custody arrangement. This part of the conversation may come later than the initial announcement. Take a look at the example scripts offered at FamilyEducation.org.

Encourage Questions

Allow your kids to explain how they feel right after the announcement and in the days to follow. Encourage any questions they may have. Listen carefully to what they have to say, and if you don’t know the answer, tell them so. Acknowledge their feelings instead of pushing them away, as this leaves the door open for maintaining an open dialogue as the divorce progresses.

Related:

We sell do-it-yourself divorce/dissolution kits as well as legal separation kits, good in the state of Washington. These kits can be bought as an instant download, or you can order one, and we’ll mail it to you:

Divorce Forms Kit without Children (also known as Dissolution Kit without Children)

Divorce Forms Kit with Children (also known as Dissolution Kit with Children)

Legal Separation Kit, Non-Contested

 

Resource for serving documents in a divorce case

Going through a divorce or dissolution of marriage is no one’s idea of fun. The good news is that you can keep costs down by completing and filing your own documents in an uncontested divorce. Plus, we found a great resource for learning how to serve the opposing party in your divorce.

First, our Washington State Divorce with Children Forms Kit (also known as Dissolution Forms Kit with Children) is a do it yourself divorce legal form kit containing all of the Washington state divorce documents you need, with instructions, to guide you through the divorce procedures, including development of a Parenting Plan and Child Support Orders, in an uncontested divorce.

Our Washington State Divorce Forms without Children (also known as Dissolution Kit with Children) is a do it yourself divorce legal form kit that contains all of the divorce forms in Washington state you need, with instructions, to guide you through each step in dissolution of marriage procedures in an uncontested divorce.

Now, there’s one more thing you must do. When you file family law court documents, you must also serve the opposing party the proper way. Otherwise, judgment in your case may be delayed.

We found a very helpful resource from WashingtonLawHelp.org that explains exactly how to serve documents. Download their free PDF How to Serve the Opposing Party in Your Family Law Case to learn why you must serve the opposing party via personal service, mail or publication. The page also explains what to do if you cannot find the opposing party and provides links to a self-help packet you can use to ask court permission to serve the other party by mail or publication.

 

Finding an attorney doesn’t have to be difficult if you follow these tips from Attorneys’ Information Bureau

When you need an attorney, how do you go about finding one? Most people wait until they’re in crisis mode to start searching. But a frantic search just adds to an already stressful situation.

“The key to finding a great attorney is to start looking right now, before you need one,” says Grant Harken, Operations Manager, Attorneys’ Information Bureau. AIB is a Seattle-based company that provides legal services to lawyers as well as resources to people who need legal help.

“Look at the process of finding a qualified lawyer the same way you do your primary physician. You need someone you can trust and call when needed,” says Harken. “Otherwise, scrambling at the last minute means you might end up with someone with less experience than you need or who is more expensive than your budget allows.”

AIB recommends searching for a law firm that offers a free initial consultation. This gives you a chance to meet in a relaxed environment and see if the chemistry is right.

“Use the free consultation to ask questions about the lawyer’s experience and background,” recommends Harken. “Ask how the attorney’s fee structure works so you know what to expect when the need arises.”

Identifying firms that offer free initial consultations can be very time-consuming. To make it easier, AIB has set up at website at aibinc.net where you can search by specialty and geographical area, then review listings to see which law firms offer free consultations. The site is sponsored by AIB as a way to promote the attorneys for whom it provides services and to foster the Washington State Bar Association’s initiative to promote Equal Access to Justice.

AIB offers one last bit of advice. “Before you make an appointment for your free consultation, do your homework. Confirm the law firm is in good standing by going to the Washington State Bar Association’s website at www.wsba.org. If you have doubts about one firm, find another one.”